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and focus on just one section about demands on the burke that in europe. quince not very long ago americans and europeans pride themselves on religious toleration and understanding. and animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the wars of religion, including as well be quieter violence of colonial religious domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added to that, domestic anti-semitism and anti catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketp
's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is going to win that arguement? >> host: a lot of people say the northern european countries, norway, sweden, et cetera, is socialists. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle. america, big capitalist country, doesn't have
a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%? i'll take spain over the united states at this point any day. >> all right. >> so don't
to society? it is very difficult to give any sort of charity for any charitable purposes in europe. it is very difficult to give service in europe. when i was asking people, they said, why would we serve? there is a bureau for that. there are some places in europe burk it is illegal to give volunteer service. as i see the united states going in the same trend of all sourcing -- outsourcing, it is so overregulated and so over controlling of your life, it takes away your freedom to even support yourself, how would you propose the government relinquished power is that it has taken over peacefully? how do you think the government would be able to let go of this control of our lives? >> i agree with every syllable you just said. [laughter] you almost provoked me to be more political than i felt comfortable doing in this chapel. leave more space, more breathing room for civil society. this astonishing combustion of voluntary association. in my remarks, i used the analogy of a tree. in the shade of which, smaller things cannot grow. that is the danger of an excess of state. >> [inaudible]
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
china and europe and japan are having major problems of their own. that could affect the way they do business with us. joining us is to talk about, ed, good to see you. biggest problem some of these governments to stimulate their economies, die let's just print a bunch of money. that has catastrophic events with them and even with the united states that may tried traded with them. >> that seems to be just to print money. that is not how it works. when somebody prints money, it's devalues their currency which makes anything they want to export or anything that they are importing more expensive. that is why your food is more expensive because we imported a lot of that. that is why energy is more expensive because we import a lot of that. if every country is doing that, its race to the bottom how quickly they can devalue their currency. >> we trade with so many different nations. we trade with europe and certainly with china. look at our trade imbalance and you can figure that out. europe has only a handful of countries that are doing decently? >> there is about six. they are in the nor
they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as less fair, and others are seen as more fair and are producing more growth, who do you think is going to win that argument? >> host: a lot of people would say the northern european countries are socialist. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example that is big in the election campaign. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle, america is the big capitalist country didn't have a
many issues. for example, we're still trying to figure out europe and the depth and duration of that economy. that's just one of many. clearly i don't need another challenge coming from the uncertainty around the fiscal cliff. >> susie: you do a lot of business in china, and you're very bullish on china. can your business in china offset any during you might have in your business from what goes on in the u. economy? >> probably not. i'm bullish in the auto business and the building trades, but that is not going to be enough to offset the fiscal cliff, and we're going to have to manage europe at the same time. >> susie: let's say there is no deal and the u.s. economy really slows down, or as some people say could go into a recession, how are you preparing for that possibility? >> we're trying to make those investments that are strategic, and holding back on our hiring because we don't know the growth rates. we're probably looking at the different ways to duce our poits from a logical standpoint, and we're trying to pull every lever to give us some latitude and leverage. >> sus
recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will not be able to subdue the south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atomic river above and below the n. no one in civilian authority, not even lincoln, had any detailed knowledge of
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
of films. the film come is going to do if they could export to europe. but instead of talking about that, she lashed out at an audience that is almost all jewish. he lashed out at them and say stop making anti-hitler films. unless you stop taking anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you're going to cause the next work. boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled and there'll be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism in this world ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jew's. by 1940, he was a total absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if you wanted, he could have a chilling the america first community, signed up with lindbergh. but he didn't want to do that because he knew if he did that there'd be no place in politics for his children at her,, ever. so he stayed quiet. there are actually as part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be that tell you, that you're going to have to read. [laughter] in 1940, he was a kennedy name is in the dirt. it is dirt among the isolationists for kennedy to comment against
by climate change? >> our economy is mainly based on tourism. incidently, mainly from europe. there have been changes in the patterns of the fish, so our whole economy is now at risk. if it continues like this, the seychelles, the sea level rise will not be our biggest problem but we will become a failed state. >> you are in the indian ocean. place yourself geographically with other islands off the coast of africa that you are near. >> we are in the group of 115 islands east of kenya, north of madagascar. we cover a huge area of the southwestern indian ocean. we're at the full mercy of what happens in the ocean. we are ocean people. anything that affects oceans, whether through increased temperatures, acidification, which is a bigger threat to khor reece that morning temperatures. >> what happened with acidification? why is that a result of climate change? >> we are reaching the limits of carbon dioxide and water can take out of the air. we have abused the oceans as we have abused the forests. >> people here have said they joked that they found something with a label made in the u.s.a., and t
't know about double-digit earnings growth, but credit in europe, and a miracle in japan. it is incredible. earnings are starting to rebound because nominal gdp is increasing and the other thing about volatility, volatility is going lower making what could have been more tight, more stability going into next year. all of these things, they will have a great year as far as price concern. liz: we showed the s&p for the year up about 16% year-over-year. the nasdaq 17%, these are beautiful performances, can they continue through 2013? >> i got asked that question a lot. people say the market is up, they are expensive, that is not necessarily so. the market is up because the consumer confidence and spending and earnings are great and the stock market made up of individual stocks that represent corporate earnings. as i look out into 2013, i see a bunch of tailwind called the energy sector, the housing sector getting a lot better. i agree capital spending and manufacturing is making a renaissance in the u.s. and all that would achieve market make for good earnings. david: i brought it up with our
parts of europe would become less risky. he basically made a goldman-sized bet at a firm that was only a sliver of goldman's size. >> the firm's stock is getting crushed yet again this morning, and mf's credit rating was cut to junk by moody's overnight. >> how can something like this be allowed to happen? how can n e individu completely shape the destiny of this firm and ultimately its demise? >> these two stories on this special ededion ontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprprprprprpp >> martin smith: it's one of america
-quality problem, turning around europe, taking india by storm, talking about adding thousands upon thousands of stores throughout china, even showed you numbers that said unlike yum, kentucky fried chicken, hasn't seen any deceleration in china. these are my ears like i listen, i've watched. howard schultz, call me crazy, investing with them, my bad. and then i heard the questions from the audience, i didn't even listen. what were they looking at versus what i was looking at. they were looking at john carter, i was looking at the new bond movie. one after another, they were all down beat. is the expansion too rapid? whether demand for expensive coffee is there. i was waiting for a guy to say, listen, that triple cappuccino it stinks. if i were howard, i would tell them to take a hike. they were too negative versus what the company's up to. opportunity. starbucks was actually down. one time -- i have the apple ipad, you know, thing i'm like, wow, it's under 50. i mean, wow. terrific opportunity. ipad, i mentioned it, surprised one didn't come down and hit me over the head and knock me out. ap
coming. >> all aboard. >> think about how often have we been clobbered by the mess in europe. every time things start to look less horrible across the atlantic, every time we begin to wonder it maybe, just maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative st
and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 europe was booming minks were giving easy money at low interest rate and prices were rising and they were buying the bonds because they pay high interest rates. but the prices are so high they reached a level where nobody could afford them they could not buy the bonds of day with some of them. 80 percent was on by the europeans. then they went into bankruptcy and the bank had to close. know more customers for the railroad bond edberg and hetty had to come back to america. this city had burgeoned with tense story buildings central part stretch north and a brownstone houses replaced the shanties and apartment houses appeared for the first time. the largest bookstore in the world, patrick's touched this guy the metropolitan museum of art opened in the museum of natural history. the exuberant spending was no different from the unfettered expansion from industrial on to procurers, promoters and real estate speculators. from 1873 the financial panic flat and the country into despair. does that sound familiar? and the stocks bounced up and down.
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
of consultation in the international regulators, canada, australia, japan, europe etc. and we continue to work the issue. i would say with banks registering the largest banks registered in the term, we are going to have more issues to sort through and we are committed to soaring through -- >> you are not talking of those that registered when you are making that statement. just the firms that register. >> but i have some expressions from some of the foreign regulators that they feel like some of the guidance may be in conflict with their loan regulator, their own that regulation and i guess that is what i am saying. if they are in conflict how are you dealing with those conflicts? >> the one example was in japan they have a clearing requirement. they actually put in place november 1st and we now have a requirement that we finished in november. there is a conflict because we both say they have to be cleared and registered clearinghouses. yet they have yet to register the london clearing house and we have yet to register the japanese clearing house. we are relieved they can use the japanese clear
've been hearing our guests across europe telling us they are worried about the way we can see markets trade lower once people come back and realize we haven't had any agreement reached on the fiscal cliff. and that essential doesn't look likely at this point. >> okay, kelly. i couldn't help detect a little -- i mean, you're over there now. you're international. the most important story of 2013 is something with japan? >> yes, joe. >> though, no, no. it's here. >> yes, yes, nope. >> that's the third biggest thing. that's a little tail. that doesn't wag the big st. bernard that is the united states. >> here is one reason. japan isn't necessarily important because of the size of its economy. so if you're talking about global gpt growth, the u.s. is still the juggernaut there. >> fiscal abyss. fiscal abyss. >> japan is not only the leading gauge of what is happening across europe, but potentially what could happen in the u.s. if these policies aren't -- enough. it's will case of this extremely high debt load, something we're discussing in the u.s. and europe right now. if it manages to en
off in europe it's made its way over here. how many times have we tossed away that broken coffee machine and bought a new one. inspiring others fix those broken household items. >> everything old is new again at the west seattle fix it collector. >> a group of that's like to get together and help each other fix whatever we own. >> from sewing machines to fans to lawn mowers, if it is broke they will try to fix it repair groups have flourished in europe and spreading to the united states. >> i like the idea of reusing something that has already had a life, already been built and created most of its environmental foot prints. >> members of the fix it collectors in brooklyn help people save the planet and a buck or two. >> throw away culture motivates a lot of us to come here and try to fight it. the economy definitely played a role. minute it breaks or the newest gadget comes out they have to get the new one and throw the old one away. it's expensive and what are we doing to the planet. >> so big in europe they attract up to half a million dollars in grants. not so here in the unit
companies going to do if they couldn't export, right, to europe? but instead of talking about that, he lashed out at an audience that was almost all jewish. he lashed out at them, and he said you guys unless you stop making anti-hitler films, the great dictator -- charlie chaplin's great dictator -- unless you stop making anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you are going to cause the next war. millions of american boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled, and there will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism this world has ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total, absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if he had wanted, he could have joined the american first community, you know, and signed up with lindbergh with, but he didn't want to do that, because he knew if he did that, there'd be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the miraculous part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be able to tell you, that you're going to hav
, we're going to get those types of storms and europe will particularly suffer from them. but when you get a hurricane embedded within one, then you get double dose and that's what happened with sandy and that kind of thing will happen, too if we get stronger cyclonic storms. and the damage goes like the cube of the wind speed. so it's not like -- you know, if the wind speed had been 10 miles per hour less, we wouldn't have had all that damage. those trees have been standing there for centuries. these were really big trees on our property. so there haven't been storms like that, or those trees wouldn't still have been there. >> and was there a human fingerprint on sandy? could you say how much climate change contributed to the ferocity and the intensity of sandy? >> well, there's a human fingerprint in several ways. the ocean was unusually warm along the eastern seaboard and it was warmer by more than the global average, so people are saying, oh, you can only credit one quarter of that to global warming. well, the warming, it's like, these extreme events that we're getting, we're getti
, china, europe, whatever, the s&p 500 up 12.1% year to date. that is a good year. that is an optimistic year. why is that? >> it seems like we're forgetting about that, doesn't it? with all this talk about what's happening going forward and concern about corporate growth. and truly, we're concerned about corporate growth as well because there really hasn't been that long-term information from our government, from our policyholde policyholders, no economic policy in real investment in assets that we've seen. that's going to be a problem going forward, not to mention the global slowdown, and we're hitting the top of corporate profits now. >> so you don't agree with this. you're turning bearish. >> not bearish in a sense of going forward intermittently. we think that most likely, we're going to see some growth hitting in the second quarter of next year. until we get through this fiscal cliff nonsense, until we see some growth coming out of china and europe, i think that -- >> china i think is showing growth. europe may not show growth in my lifetime, but they're going to be bailed out. do
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
around the globe, europe is in a terrible recession. they have huge debt problems. you have bigger problems in asia than you thought we would have a. ande can get this one right actually make a real road to bring in new revenue and reduce our costs so that we bring our budget into balance, i think it is a huge opportunity for economic revival in america that around the globe will make us proud and create jobs. it is tough. if the president gets its right, we have a huge ability to see an economic revival we have all been waiting for. >> let me follow up on a ci. specific point. you said earlier that indicating it should be up to states to tailor programs when it comes to implementing certain aspects of obamacare. should states have this flexibility? flexibility? >>
factors going on here too. europe and are drowning in debt. china has a near $3 trillion reserve surplus. you've got demographics. europe and america are aging rapidly. in europe the population is shrinking. there is no such demographic problem in china. you add it all together, debt, demographics and growth rate china is indeed on course to become number one fairly soon. gregg, hold on a second. there is a danger in just extrapolating out from current trends. what's in place will go on forever. we did that with japan 30 years ago. got that one wrong. maybe we shouldn't be extrapolating like this with china. gregg: the other thing that is very conspicuous here is the enormous trade imbalance with china. our trade deficit with china has tripled over the last 10 years. point of fact i just looked it up today. we export 7%. they export 23% to the united states. isn't that a job killer for americans? >> yes it is. there is no question about it. many of the jobs which our fathers and grandfathers had in the united states left a generation ago or 10 years ago, they left for china and that's ba
popular surge. >> eastern europe after the war, it's a black hole, actually in european history, very few people know very much about it. one of the points of writing the book was to put together both work people have done in other langes and also to use archives and interviews to tell a story that hasn't been very well told. how it is communism took over the region, how is it done. >> how quickly after the end of world war ii did the iron curtain, communist take over europe? >> it actually happened quite fast in the sense that when he red army came into the region, they were already prepared. they didn't know how long it was going to take and didn't have a ten-point plan but they began trying to control key institutions from the beginning, including the secret police, and also the radio and various -- other parts of the society they considered important. that one from from '44 or '45. >> where were the strongest areas of resistance? >> probably in poland. there was an armed resistance, the partisans, who were operating from the woods, particularly in eastern poland, and they were -- >> l
winter, the u.n. said that ukraine was the worst hit by severe cold in europe. more than 100 people died then. now volunteers are urging everyone to do everything possible to save lives. the government is opening temporary shelters for homeless people around the country where they can warm themselves and have a hot drink. many have complained that very often these shelters on and on the outskirts of major cities of sometimes too hard to find. >> you need to take a bus to get there but i don't have any money to pay for my fair. i don't think i would be better off there. >> many homeless ukrainians will have to spend the new year holiday in these temporary shelters. according to weather forecasts, if a bit warmer in the ukraine in january. >> an ambitious mission to drill through 3 kilometers of antarctic ice has been cut short. they aimed to explore a lake that had been hidden for half a million years. the project to find hints of simple life existing in these extreme conditions. however, they failed and the team was forced to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into t
against our people, who took to the streets to demand freedom. long live syria, free and europe. >> he also defected from the bashar al-assad government. before that he held several high-ranking posts including the ambassador to sweden. i asked him how significant it is. >> it is very significant because one of the highest- ranking officers that have affected so far, and this man is the head of the military police and he must know a lot of things that have been going on by the army, invading the cities and killing civilians and bombarding the area with chemical weapons. he has said homs was bombed with chemical weapons. this is his statement. i think he was in a position to do this because you have all the reports coming to him. >> is it really that significant given that bashar al-assad still can count the military in multiples of tens of thousands? he is getting help from the russians, the iranians, and also has fallen out of lebanon. he looks pretty secure and appears to be acting with impunity. >> you are right. we cannot forget the fact this person has a lot of information about t
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
. they could start making the point europe and japan has been doing this a couple of years now, massively raising taxes. japan is now in official recession. southern europe is contracting. france and germany about to go into recession. what can't you guys learn? higher taxes don't work. melissa: yeah. but seems lying the public at large has not bought that argument. mitt romney tried to make that argument. a lot of people tried to make the argument. it hasn't worked. >> you emphasize what is the best way to get the economy moving again. means to end. instead of fighting on democrat's ground, establish your own ground. taxes does notn growth. greater spending does not mean growth. mammoth regulations taking away control from patients does not lead to growth. fight on your own turf instead of democrats. melissa: you're a master of negotiation. you know so much about this. how would you reset the negotiations? >> toss out a few grenades. passing in the house entitlement reforms can't take any benefits from existing beneficiaries. love to see the senate reject that one. how about another bill
into what you think your version should be for adopting the paa that's why europe into asia because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it was not designed to be in the long term missile ballistic architecture. there's benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have diminished because they are mature of enough to have it. as far as the intercepters to be productive, you have to look across the technologies that we pursue, and recognize that the significant technology challenges that have been associated with that program, and really, i think you have to -- in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've done the technology part of the -- of this ballistic missile defense have done amazing things in that time frame, t
that he is in the running tells you quite a lot about the importance of europe this year. earlier today, we were talking about the fact that they had picked trichet on in the past. he doesn't necessarily regret it. he said oppose dollars to some of the other types of running, they look for someone who is having a positive impact. they did consider angela merkel. that's the answers with regard to the person of the year. let me give you a quick sense of what else has been happening in europe overnight. the big moves, we're coming out of asia. 4.3% of the shanghai composite. it just had its best day in three years. this follows some pmi data that supported the idea of domestic spending. of course, it's been this coiled spring market over the last couple of weeks. after we saw the shanghai fall below the 2,000 level, it's in several big days. the news agency tweeted a picture of chinese stockbrokers grinning this morning to give you a sense of the mood. compare that to the nikkei which was down this morning going into the election these weekend likely to put shinzo abe back in power. he's s
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